Gluten Free Bread

by Jill Dalton

I can’t wait for you to try this Plant Based Gluten Free, salt, oil and refined sugar free Bread! It is great for sandwiches and even better as toast. Trying to find gluten free bread in the grocery store that is also Vegan and tastes good is almost impossible. I have finally perfected this recipe and have been making it for my family for quite a while now. They all love it and I find that I am making about a loaf every other day!

Gluten Free Bread

Serves: 8 Prep Time: Cooking Time:
Nutrition facts: 200 calories 20 grams fat
Rating: 3.4/5
( 369 voted )

Ingredients

1/2 cup buckwheat groats
1/2 cup quinoa
1 1/2 cups Gluten Free Oats
1/4 cup chia seeds
1/4 cup psyllium husk
1 tsp aluminum free baking powder
1/2 tsp aluminum free baking soda
1/4 cup unsweetened applesauce
1 1/2 cups water
1 tsp salt (optional)

Instructions

  1. Soak buckwheat and quinoa overnight.
  2. Preheat oven to 350°.
  3. Rinse and drain buckwheat and quinoa.
  4. Place all ingredients into a food processor and mix lightly, just until mixture is blended together. (over mixing  might prevent bread from baking through).
  5. Pour into a silicone bread pan or lightly oiled bread pan.
  6. Bake for 1 hour.
  7. Remove from pan and let cool completely before cutting. As it cools, it continues to "set" and firm up. 
Did You Make This Recipe?
Take a picture and share the love? Tag me on Instagram at @wholefoodplantbasedcookingshow

You may also like

159 comments

Kiesha May 31, 2020 - 1:45 pm

I don’t have buckwheat. Is there something else I could use to substitute for it or would I just increase the amount of quinoa?

Reply
Jill Dalton June 3, 2020 - 6:00 pm

I have heard that some people have used millet instead. I haven’t tried making it with just the quinoa so I’m not sure if it would work, sorry.
Jill

Reply
MaryEllen Bunce November 22, 2020 - 4:30 pm

Hi Jill, I have been playing with this recipe and have found that replacing the applesauce with vegan buttermilk gives the bread more rise. I actually today made the best loaf yet by using 3/4 cup buttermilk and a cup of water. I am thankful for this wholesome gf bread. Keeps so well in the fridge. Thank you for your inspiration. Has definitely helped us transition to. a WFPB diet.
Been 4 months and it’s going great!

Reply
Jill Dalton November 23, 2020 - 10:13 am

That sounds even more delicious! I will have to try that. Thank you MaryEllen

Reply
eliz February 24, 2021 - 8:19 pm

Do you make the vegan buttermilk with soy milk and vinegar?

Reply
Patty Watson January 29, 2021 - 8:58 am

Hi Jill, I made this bread, in fact I have made it twice, and love it!
I was going to bring some to work for a friend who is gluten free. She asked what was in this and when I told her buckwheat she said buckwheat isn’t gluten free. Just thought I would let you know.

Reply
Eva White February 6, 2021 - 11:26 am

Buckwheat is gluten-free. I know the name is deceiving, but it is actually a seed.

Reply
Abigail Usha June 6, 2020 - 6:11 pm

Hi Jill, can I use psyllium powder in place of psyllium husks? What’s the quantity like?

Reply
Kimber Mullen April 6, 2021 - 1:00 pm

I used psyllium husk powder, and it’s much thicker than Jill’s, based on the video, so I added a half cup of unsweetened soy milk and it came out fine. I think next time though, I will cut back the powder to 1/8 cup since it seems to gel much more than husks, but that’s just my experience.

Reply
Jenn June 11, 2020 - 1:28 pm

I have been gluten free for over 10 years, and I have never been able to make a successful gluten free bread from scratch. I just made this today, and it is so easy and tasty! I love the fact that the bread uses whole food ingredients and is flour free! Thank you for posting this recipe!

Reply
Neuza January 27, 2021 - 10:30 am

I made the bread and it looks wet inside, what did I do wrong?

Reply
Jill Dalton January 28, 2021 - 10:54 am

You might have overblended the mixture. The inside does stay a bit moist but after sitting a cooling everything sets up a bit more.

Reply
Avilone Starre June 6, 2021 - 10:19 pm

today I made this bread and it turned out perfect! after soaking the grains, i poured the grains into a colander lined with cheesecloth, rinsed then squeezed out the remaining liquid before putting the grains into my processor. The middle set up perfectly after cooling completely. We love it and look forward to adding different seasonings, herbs. I think squeezing out excess moisture helps with the too moist center problem. Thx!

Reply
Michelle June 23, 2020 - 9:00 am

Hi Jill,
I’m not sure what I’m doing wrong, but I have tried this bread recipe three different times and each time it comes out really dense and gooey. For the first two batches, I had red quinoa and psyllium husk powder, so I thought that was the issue. I bought psyllium husk fiber and white quinoa and even bought new baking soda and baking powder just to be sure that wasn’t it.

This morning, I made the new batch and was encouraged when the dough wasn’t as thick as the last two batches, but after baking it for an hour and 15 minutes, it is very similar to the first two tries. It’s super dense and not completely cooked. It also didn’t rise much.

Any advice?

Thanks!

Reply
v. blanchard August 11, 2020 - 3:39 pm

I have found when baking various gluten free bread recipes that the pan can make the difference between cooked versus soggy, ie., glass versus metal pans.. And another factor is whether it’s lined with parchment or not. If Jill had success with silicon then I will go with silicon as well.

Reply
Pam October 28, 2020 - 1:59 pm

It is very dense. But you might want to consider the amount of water in your quinoa and buckwheat that contributes to the moisture level of the batter. Maybe you need to reduce the amount of added water to compensate.

Reply
Deborah Whiting June 24, 2020 - 6:34 pm

Hi Jill
Sorry if you have already answered this question but the applesauce looks like a dry ingredient? I know applesauce to be cooked apple. Could you clarify this for me please. Can’t wait to make this for my grandson who has Coeliac disease.
Many thanks
Deborah

Reply
Liz July 9, 2020 - 9:52 am

Hi! Can I use buckwheat flour instead of buckwheat? If so, should I use less than 1/2 a cup? Thanks you!

Reply
Jill Dalton July 10, 2020 - 1:06 pm

Hi Liz, I wouldn’t use buckwheat four because it is usually ground too fine and it keeps the bread from cooking completely in the middle. It stays kind of gummy. If you don’t have buckwheat, you could try millet or quinoa.

Reply
Ellen Dillinger July 16, 2020 - 4:19 pm

As a type 1 diabetic/gluten intolerant vegetarian, I was looking for a bread I could make and eat. Tried your gluten-free recipe and added cinnamon and (after food processing) blueberries to it. My blood sugar and insulin use dropped surprisingly within weeks of making this change. That’s the only life change I’ve made during the three month time period, so I have to attribute the health improvement to this bread. Also, it tastes good, has a great texture, and can be used for anything “store” bread is used for. Thank you so much!

Reply
Liz July 22, 2020 - 9:55 pm

Hi Jill,
I tried quinoa instead of buckwheat flour and it worked great! Thanks for your help.

Have you tried storing this bread (sliced) in the freezer or fridge for longer shelf life? Would it work like the other gf breads, where you take the frozen slice out, toast it, and it works great? I wasn’t sure if it would turn gooey…

Thanks,
Liz

Reply
Jill Dalton August 1, 2020 - 9:30 am

It freezes great!

Reply
Lori August 5, 2020 - 3:29 pm

Jill, I love your site, videos, and healthy and tasty recipes. I make sure I have this Gluten Free Bread on hand at all times (and I’m not even gluten intolerant). I love this bread served with your Vegan Cream Cheese recipe. Thanks for giving us healthy alternatives to favorite foods.

Reply
Ruizi Li August 9, 2020 - 4:10 pm

It’s definitely the most delicious gluten-free bread I’ve had, and the easiest to make too! Made a batch yesterday. Great with pecan butter and coconut butter!

Reply
Teresa Hermann August 21, 2020 - 8:30 pm

I made this last night and it’s amazing… moist, chewy and deeply satisfying! My German husband, who is VERY picky about his bread, loves it. I don’t ever need to buy bread again!

Jill, what do you suggest to store it… counter top or fridge, plastic or paper covering? I’ll definitely make 2 loaves at a time, and slice and freeze the second one for later.

Reply
Jill Dalton August 22, 2020 - 10:13 am

I would keep it in the fridge in an airtight container. It will be good for over a week. It also stores wonderfully in the freezer.

Reply
Teresa Hermann August 22, 2020 - 10:24 am

Will do… thanks so much!

Reply
Cedars February 4, 2021 - 3:58 pm

one loaf doesn’t last a week at my house. I don’t worry about length of storage. Thank you Jill.

Reply
Teresa Hermann August 22, 2020 - 11:41 am

Jill, does your bread rise much? Mine was flat. Wondering if the time in the food processor makes a difference, i.e., longer vs. shorter mixing time?

Reply
Jill Dalton August 22, 2020 - 4:40 pm

It doesn’t rise that much. I baked it in a smaller bread pan so it is taller. Mine is 4″ x 6 1/2″

Reply
Teresa Hermann August 22, 2020 - 6:42 pm

Ah, my silicone bread pan is 4″ x 9″, so that makes a difference. I’ll keep my eye out for a smaller pan… it would be easier to make a sandwich then!

Reply
Paula August 26, 2020 - 7:04 pm

Hi Jill
I want to try the bread. I do not like the taste of quinoa. Can I use millet instead?

Reply
Jill Dalton August 28, 2020 - 9:27 am

Yes,

Reply
Danesh September 8, 2020 - 2:03 pm

Hello Jill, the recipe looks so promising!
I just have to ask, because I haven’t seen it in the previous comments – don’t you need to add apple cider vinegar to balance the baking soda?
Thanks!

Reply
Jill Dalton September 9, 2020 - 10:01 am

That is a good question. I’m not sure on the science behind the vinegar and baking soda reaction but it might actually improve the rise for this bread. I will have to try it.

Reply
Kris October 16, 2020 - 6:32 am

Jill, I made this bread and am so happy with it! Thank you so much for creating and sharing this recipe! I love it!

Reply
Pam October 28, 2020 - 1:54 pm

Buyer Beware! I made this and found it unexpectedly sweet. Finally figured it out…my psyllium was sweeten with fructose. Didn’t have any psyllium for the second attempt, so I substituted Hemp hulls. Came out fine. Will continue to make this. Think maybe I’ll add raw sunflower kernels after the blending next time. My oven requires an extra 5-10 minutes.

Reply
Sarah Cooke December 5, 2020 - 8:16 pm

Should the buckwheat and quinoa measure half a cup before soaking or after soaking?

Reply
Jill Dalton December 6, 2020 - 10:14 am

Before

Reply
MaryB January 12, 2021 - 12:01 pm

Hulled buckwheat or buckwheat groats?

Reply
Jill Dalton January 13, 2021 - 9:18 am

Hulled Buckwheat

Reply
Cindy G April 17, 2021 - 1:37 pm

I’m confused, the recipe calls for buckwheat groats but here you are saying hulled buckwheat? Are they the same thing?

Reply
Jill Dalton April 19, 2021 - 8:56 am

Yes, they are the same thing

Reply
Debbie January 18, 2021 - 2:33 pm

Made your bread today after seeing you on Chef AJ. Thank you so very much for sharing this recipe. It turned out perfect. Do you happen to know the nutritional information? Thanks, Debbie

Reply
Jill Dalton January 20, 2021 - 9:59 am

Thank you Debbie. I don’t have the nutritional info, sorry

Reply
Sally February 15, 2021 - 8:00 am

Raw buckwheat or toasted (kasha)?

Reply
Jill Dalton February 15, 2021 - 9:57 am

raw

Reply
Patty Watson January 29, 2021 - 9:24 am

Jill, I was mistaken Buckwheat is gluten free. So sorry! I told her barley instead of buckwheat. My error

Reply
Jodi February 1, 2021 - 8:01 pm

Can I substitute something for the buckwheat such as millet? Looking forward to making this!!

Reply
Jill Dalton February 3, 2021 - 10:26 am

Some other viewers have written in and said that they used millet instead and it worked but I haven’t personally

Reply
Deb February 26, 2021 - 10:48 am

I am going to start making this bread every week and don’t want to buy little bags of ingredients every week at the grocery. I’d rather buy bulk and store in the freezer. Is anyone else doing this? If so, do you have a good source to order ingredients from?

Reply
eliz March 1, 2021 - 2:08 pm

Thank you for this easy and quick bread recipe. I’ve made the original and other variations and they’ve all turned out great!

Reply
Claire Adams March 27, 2021 - 8:47 am

The comments here seem to fall into two camps. Those who love the bread and those for whom it turns out soggy and seemingly uncooked. I had high hopes but unfortunately mine fell into the soggy, uncooked camp. Underwhelming.

Reply
Magy April 5, 2021 - 11:31 am

Since I don’t have a food processor, I was hesitant to make this bread, but I saw that a previous comment stated that they had success with hand mixing the ingredients, so I decided to give it a try. It worked, but the texture was not the best. I loved it, but my family could not say the same, but, more for me! The only issue I had was a little trouble getting it out of the pan, as I lightly oiled it. I will definitely make this again though, because it is better than any store bought GF bread I’ve ever had!

Reply
Laura April 11, 2021 - 8:54 pm

I made this bread recipe and ended up with a wet gooey middle. I wondered if baking it longer would help, so I continued baking it for TWO HOURS. It never cooked through. I showed it to my brother, a baker who owns his own bakery and makes gluten-free bread there. He said I’d discovered a plant-based substitute for cement. LOL! I have a hunch I over-blended it. I will try again.

Reply
Jill Dalton April 13, 2021 - 7:04 pm

Sometimes if you over blend the mixture it doesn’t cook through in the center. It stays a bit moist until it has cooled completely. It takes that extra time to “set”. I will make a note on the recipe.

Reply
1 2

Leave a Reply to Teresa Hermann Cancel reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.